Monthly Archives: August 2011

Symposium: A Continuing Conversation: Moses Mendelssohn and the Legacy of the Enlightenment

Moses Mendelssohn

Sunday, September 18th A day of discussion and debate devoted to exploring the wrings and legacy of Moses Mendelssohn, the 18th-century founder of modern Jewish thought. A group of international scholars will highlight recent scholarship related to contemporary issues in religion, secularism, politics, culture, language and identity.

Exhibition: A Continuing Conversation – Moses Mendelssohn and the Legacy of the Enlightenment

A letter written by Moses Mendelssohn, 18th century

As both a leading Enlightenment philosopher and a learned, observant Jew, Mendelssohn has come to symbolize many of the tensions within both modern Judaism and the Enlightenment itself. This exhibit explores the theme of conversation in Mendelssohn’s legacy, including his relationships, his writings, his concept of Judaism, and the Enlightenment.

Leo Baeck Salon Explores the Logistics of Memory in Berlin

Luca Vanello's "Memory Pill" consists of a single photograph, disintegrated and compressed into a gelatin capsule, offering to bring the observer back to a specific moment and memory.

At the 9th Leo Baeck Salon, seventeen young artists transformed shipping containers in an industrial Berlin neighborhood into art spaces with sculptures inspired by LBI collections. The artists, all students in Gregor Schneider’s sculpture class at the Berlin University of the Arts, engaged with LBI archives at the Jewish Musuem in Berlin.

Panel Discussion: Restitution of Nazi-looted Art – Latest Developments

Anselm Feuerbach - Head of A Girl

Tuesday, October 4, 2011 6:30pm Leo Baeck Institute and the American Council on Germany present a panel featuring three experts that represent a wide-range of domestic and international interests in connection with the recovery of Nazi-looted art.

NEH and DFG to Fund Initiative to Recreate Seminal Judaica Collection

Book Digitization (cc) Stanford University Library

The $180,000 grant, jointly funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft – DFG), will allow LBI to digitize about 1,000 books that have been identified as missing from the Frankfurt Library’s Judaica collection.