Translation: “The Haggadah Manuscript preserved in the Germanisches Museum in Nuremberg, created in the year 5252 (or 1492 in our customary reckoning) by the German scribe Joel b.R. Simon for Nathan b.R. Salomo adds to the words “leshana haba b’yerushalayim” (next year in Jerusalem) the addendum, “or in Brünn.”

Translation: "The Haggadah Manuscript preserved in the Germanisches Museum in Nuremberg, created in the year 5252 (or 1492 in our customary reckoning) by the German scribe Joel b.R. Simon for Nathan b.R. Salomo adds to the words “leshana haba b'yerushalayim” (next year in Jerusalem) the addendum, “or in Brünn.”

Translation: “The Haggadah Manuscript preserved in the Germanisches Museum in Nuremberg, created in the year 5252 (or 1492 in our customary reckoning) by the German scribe Joel b.R. Simon for Nathan b.R. Salomo adds to the words “leshana haba b’yerushalayim” (next year in Jerusalem) the addendum, “or in Brünn.” The author, we assume, was probably expelled with the Jews from Brünn in 1454, and here in his old age, he gives moving expression to his longing for the home he was forced to leave in his youth. This kind of conscious reinterpretation of the formerly intended meaning is not unusual. In the house of our parents in Worms, we traditionally called out with joyous voices “leshana haba b’ Worms am Rhein.” “Next year in Worms, our home.”

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