Children’s Literature

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AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

Haggadah des Kindes - Crossing the Red Sea

Haggadah des Kindes - Crossing the Red Sea

The illustration that depicts the crossing of the Red Sea includes tabs that reveal Pharaoh's soldiers in the water when pulled.

Board Game - Durch Wüstensand ins Heilige Land (Through Desert Sands to the Holy Land)

Board Game - Durch Wüstensand ins Heilige Land (Through Desert Sands to the Holy Land)

Emil Bernhard Cohn also published the "Jüdischer Kinderkalender" or "Jewish Youth Calendar", annually beginning in 1928. This board game was included as an insert in volume one. Players imagine that they are participating in the Exodus from Egypt. For example, a player who lands on a square 28 loses three terms for dancing around the golden calf.

Emil Bernhard Cohn, Editor of the

Emil Bernhard Cohn, Editor of the "Children's Haggadah" and the "Jewish Youth Calendars"

Cohn was born in Berlin in 1881 into a liberal and observant Jewish family with Zionist sympathies. After completing his religious education he was appointed as a Prediger in the Berlin Jewish community, but he was suspended in 1907 because of pro-Zionist comments ascribed to him. His suspension unleashed an uproar within the Jewish community of Berlin, which at the time was strongly divided over Zionism. Over the next decades, he served elsewhere as a rabbi and began publishing plays and essays under the pseudonym Emil Bernhard. He emigrated to the United States in 1939 and remained there until his death.

Oskar Seyffert (author) and Walter Trier (illustrator) Spielzeug, (1922), Cover

Oskar Seyffert (author) and Walter Trier (illustrator) Spielzeug, (1922), Cover

Illustrator Walter Trier was born to a German-speaking Jewish family in Prague in 1905 and is best-known for illustrating the beloved children's novel "Emil and the Detectives" by Erich Kästner. "Toys", which Trier illustrated for folklorist Oskar Seyffert, includes 20 colored plates depicting traditional wooden toys.

Oskar Seyffert (author) and Walter Trier (illustrator) Spielzeug, (1922), Plate 5

Oskar Seyffert (author) and Walter Trier (illustrator) Spielzeug, (1922), Plate 5

The first plate in "Toys" by Seyffert and Trier depicts a wooden rocking horse described as a "proud rider from Seiffen." Seiffen, in Saxony, is still famous for its traditional handmade wooden toys.

 Siegfried Abeles,

Siegfried Abeles, "Tams Reise durch die juedische Maerchenwelt " 1922

This book with illustrations by F.V. Kosak includes 25 Jewish folk tales for children.

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.The illustration that depicts the crossing of the Red Sea includes tabs that reveal Pharaoh's soldiers in the water when pulled.Emil Bernhard Cohn also published the "Jüdischer Kinderkalender" or "Jewish Youth Calendar", annually beginning in 1928.  This board game was included as an insert in volume one.  Players imagine that they are participating in the Exodus from Egypt.  For example, a player who lands on a square 28 loses three terms for dancing around the golden calf.Cohn was born in Berlin in 1881 into a liberal and observant Jewish family with Zionist sympathies. After completing his religious education he was appointed as a Prediger in the Berlin Jewish community, but he was suspended in 1907 because of pro-Zionist comments ascribed to him. His suspension unleashed an uproar within the Jewish community of Berlin, which at the time was strongly divided over Zionism. Over the next decades, he served elsewhere as a rabbi and began publishing plays and essays under the pseudonym Emil Bernhard. He emigrated to the United States in 1939 and remained there until his death.Illustrator Walter Trier was born to a German-speaking Jewish family in Prague in 1905 and is best-known for illustrating the beloved children's novel "Emil and the Detectives" by Erich Kästner. "Toys", which Trier illustrated for folklorist Oskar Seyffert, includes 20 colored plates depicting traditional wooden toys.The first plate in "Toys" by Seyffert and Trier depicts a wooden rocking horse described as a "proud rider from Seiffen."  Seiffen, in Saxony, is still famous for its traditional handmade wooden toys.This book with illustrations by F.V. Kosak includes 25 Jewish folk tales for children.

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