Expressionists – Ludwig Meidner

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Meidner, Ludwig, (1884-1966) Self Portrait (1915)

Meidner, Ludwig, (1884-1966) Self Portrait (1915)

An artist and poet, Ludwig Meidner was the foremost and most radical exponent of a second wave of Expressionism, a movement which championed the cause of the exploited and suppressed. After WWI he joined the 'November Group' and the revolutionary 'Workers' Council for Art.'

 Meidner, Ludwig, Prophet (1915)

Meidner, Ludwig, Prophet (1915)

Nadel, Arno, (1878-1943) Man in Frame with Hebrew Scripture

Nadel, Arno, (1878-1943) Man in Frame with Hebrew Scripture

Born in Vilna, Lithuania, Arno Nadel was a composer, arranger, conductor, writer, poet and painter; he also dedicated himself to the collection of both Eastern European folk songs and old manuscripts of Jewish liturgical music, and in 1916 he was appointed as Kapellmeister of the Berlin Jewish community. Over 100 original drawings and prints by Nadel are available in DigiBaeck.

Steinhardt, Jakob (1887-1969), Family of Beggars at Entrance to Village, 1930

Steinhardt, Jakob (1887-1969), Family of Beggars at Entrance to Village, 1930

Jakob Steinhardt, a major exponent of Expressionism, studied with Lovis Corinth, Hermann Struck, and Henri Matisse. In 1912, he co-founded the group Die Pathetiker (The Dramatists), together with Ludwig Meidner and Richard Janthur, which had its first group show at the Sturm Gallery a year later. He fled from Nazi Germany to Palestine in 1933 and taught at the Bezalel Art School in Jerusalem and later became its director.

Kesting, Edmund, 1892-1970, Portrait of Herwarth Walden, (1928)

Kesting, Edmund, 1892-1970, Portrait of Herwarth Walden, (1928)

Herwarth Walden (actual name Georg Lewin, 1879 – 1941) was a German Expressionist artist and art expert in many disciplines. He is broadly acknowledged as one of the most important discoverers and promoters of German avant-garde art in the early twentieth century

 Lipman-Wulf, Peter, (1905-1993) Fire--The Descent, #3, Drypoint Etching (1975)

Lipman-Wulf, Peter, (1905-1993) Fire--The Descent, #3, Drypoint Etching (1975)

Peter Lipman-Wulf was born in Berlin and studied at the Berlin Academy. He left Germany in 1933 when the Nazis came to power. He immigrated to France in 1933 and in 1939 he was interned in the Les Milles camp in southern France. He immigrated to the United States in 1947. Lipman-Wulf worked in wood, bronze, and ceramics in a semi-abstract style that often reflected the influence of German Expressionism.

An artist and poet, Ludwig Meidner was the foremost and most radical exponent of a second wave of Expressionism, a movement which championed the cause of the exploited and suppressed. After WWI he joined the 'November Group' and the revolutionary 'Workers' Council for Art.'Meidner, Ludwig, Prophet (1915)Born in Vilna, Lithuania, Arno Nadel was a composer, arranger, conductor, writer, poet and painter; he also dedicated himself to the collection of both Eastern European folk songs and old manuscripts of Jewish liturgical music, and in 1916 he was appointed as Kapellmeister of the Berlin Jewish community.  Over 100 original drawings and prints by Nadel are available in DigiBaeck.Jakob Steinhardt, a major exponent of Expressionism, studied with Lovis Corinth, Hermann Struck, and Henri Matisse. In 1912, he co-founded the group Die Pathetiker (The Dramatists), together with Ludwig Meidner and Richard Janthur, which had its first group show at the Sturm Gallery a year later. He fled from Nazi Germany to Palestine in 1933 and taught at the Bezalel Art School in Jerusalem and later became its director.Herwarth Walden (actual name Georg Lewin, 1879 – 1941) was a German Expressionist artist and art expert in many disciplines. He is broadly acknowledged as one of the most important discoverers and promoters of German avant-garde art in the early twentieth centuryPeter Lipman-Wulf was born in Berlin and studied at the Berlin Academy. He left Germany in 1933 when the Nazis came to power. He immigrated to France in 1933 and in 1939 he was interned in the Les Milles camp in southern France. He immigrated to the United States in 1947. Lipman-Wulf worked in wood, bronze, and ceramics in a semi-abstract style that often reflected the influence of German Expressionism.

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