Illustrators – Hermann Struck, Hugo Steiner-Prag, E.M. Lilien

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Lilien, E.M.

Lilien, E.M. "Sabbath" from Die Buecher der Bibel Vol 1. (1908)

Illustrator E.M. Lilien was the foremost Jewish proponent of Art Nouveau or Jugendstil. He explored Jewish themes and left behind a powerful oeuvre that formed a blueprint for future Zionist iconography. LBI has digitized 11 books illustrated by Lilien, which contain most of his striking etchings. Lilien brought his Art Nouveau style to bear on several volumes of Eduard Reuss's translation of the Hebrew Bible into German.

Lilien, E.M. page 37 from Die Buecher der Bibel Vol 1. (1908)

Lilien, E.M. page 37 from Die Buecher der Bibel Vol 1. (1908)

"Die Schöpfung der Welt" (The Creation of the World)

Lilien, E.M.

Lilien, E.M. "Das Stille Lied", from Juda: Gesaenge by Boerries, Freiherrn v. Muenchhausen

Lilien's illustrations for Börries Freiherr von Münchhausen's poetry volume "Juda" depict also scenes from the Torah in a heroic manner with many erotic undertones.

 Lilien, E.M.

Lilien, E.M. "An der Nähmaschine" from Lieder des Ghetto / by Morris Rosenfeld (ca. 1902)

Though many of Lilien's works were heroic and idealized depictions of biblical themes, his drawings for this German translation of Morris Rosenfeld's volume of Yiddish Poetry, "Lieder Des Ghettos" (Songs of the Ghetto) focused on displacement, suffering and alienation in the Diaspora.

Der Jüdische Mai, by E.M. Lilien (1847-1925) from Lieder des Ghettos, by Morris Rosenfeld. 1902.

Der Jüdische Mai, by E.M. Lilien (1847-1925) from Lieder des Ghettos, by Morris Rosenfeld. 1902.

The Zionist theme of connecting hope for future redemption with the Promised Land is also prominent in "Songs of the Ghetto."

Golem (1927), Steiner-Prag, Hugo, (1880-1945)

Golem (1927), Steiner-Prag, Hugo, (1880-1945)

Czech-born painter and illustrator Hugo Steiner-Prag, who was partial to tales of the fantastic, illustrated the Gustav Meyrink novel, "The Golem", published in a luxury edition in Leipzig by Kurt Wolff, 1916. In most of the illustrations of the old Jewish quarter of Prague is the protagonist as much as the Golem. In this later drawing, however the bulky figure of the Golem looms on the page in isolation accompanied only by what appear to be a double shadow.

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor:

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor: "And ye shall take you on the first day of the fruit of goodly trees...." (Sukkot, Day 1)

Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.

Steiner-Prag, Hugo, from The Devil's Elixir by E.T.A. Hoffman: Monks performing a ceremony, (1907)

Steiner-Prag, Hugo, from The Devil's Elixir by E.T.A. Hoffman: Monks performing a ceremony, (1907)

Like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Hugo-Steiner Prag was partial to tales of the fantastic. Steiner-Prag's plates for an edition of Hoffmann's gothic novel "The Devil's Elixir" (1815) were among his earliest works and helped earn him his professorship in Prague.

Hermann Struck (1876-1944), Photograph, undated

Hermann Struck (1876-1944), Photograph, undated

Hermann Struck was born Chaim Aaron ben David in 1876 in Germany. He is best known as a master etcher, lithographer and early Zionist. He studied for five years at the Berlin Academy and in 1908 wrote "Die Kunst des Radierens" (The Art of Etching), while mentoring artists such as Marc Chagall, Max Liebermann and Lesser Ury.

Struck, Hermann, Standing Soldier With Rifle, (ca. 1914)

Struck, Hermann, Standing Soldier With Rifle, (ca. 1914)

Struck volunteered for service during World War I, which brought him into contact with the Yiddish-speaking populations of Eastern European Jewry, an important subject of his work.

Struck, Hermann, Jewish Cobbler in Wilna, (1915)

Struck, Hermann, Jewish Cobbler in Wilna, (1915)

Struck's etchings of Eastern European Jews were published in "Das Ostjüdische Antlitz" (The Face of Eastern Jewry) in 1922 with an Essay by Arnold Zweig. Zweig drew a romantic portrait of the eastern Jewish communities, which he viewed as authentic and vital. He hoped to persuade the German public to revise its mostly negative opinion of the displaced East European Jewish population that was pouring into Germany, resulting in acrimonious debates over the “Jewish question”

Struck, Hermann,  Rachel, Jewish young woman in Kowno, (1915)

Struck, Hermann, Rachel, Jewish young woman in Kowno, (1915)

Hermann Struck became a committed Zionist. He immigrated to Haifa where he created an artistic community and participated in the development of the Tel Aviv Museum and the Bezalel art school in Jerusalem.

Illustrator E.M. Lilien was the foremost Jewish proponent of Art Nouveau or Jugendstil.  He explored Jewish themes and left behind a powerful oeuvre that formed a blueprint for future Zionist iconography.  LBI has digitized 11 books illustrated by Lilien, which contain most of his striking etchings.  Lilien brought his Art Nouveau style to bear on several volumes of Eduard Reuss's translation of the Hebrew Bible into German."Die Schöpfung der Welt" (The Creation of the World)Lilien's illustrations for Börries Freiherr von Münchhausen's poetry volume "Juda" depict also scenes from the Torah in a heroic manner with many erotic undertones.Though many of Lilien's works were heroic and idealized depictions of biblical themes, his drawings for this German translation of Morris Rosenfeld's volume of Yiddish Poetry, "Lieder Des Ghettos" (Songs of the Ghetto) focused on displacement, suffering and alienation in the Diaspora.The Zionist theme of connecting hope for future redemption with the Promised Land is also prominent in "Songs of the Ghetto."Czech-born painter and illustrator Hugo Steiner-Prag, who was partial to tales of the fantastic, illustrated the Gustav Meyrink novel, "The Golem", published in a luxury edition in Leipzig by Kurt Wolff, 1916. In most of the illustrations of the old Jewish quarter of Prague is the protagonist as much as the Golem. In this later drawing, however the bulky figure of the Golem looms on the page in isolation accompanied only by what appear to be a double shadow.Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.Like E.T.A. Hoffmann, Hugo-Steiner Prag was partial to tales of the fantastic.  Steiner-Prag's plates for an edition of Hoffmann's gothic novel "The Devil's Elixir" (1815) were among his earliest works and helped earn him his professorship in Prague.Hermann Struck was born Chaim Aaron ben David in 1876 in Germany. He is best known as a master etcher, lithographer and early Zionist. He studied for five years at the Berlin Academy and in 1908 wrote "Die Kunst des Radierens" (The Art of Etching), while mentoring artists such as Marc Chagall, Max Liebermann and Lesser Ury.Struck volunteered for service during World War I, which brought him into contact with the Yiddish-speaking populations of Eastern European Jewry, an important subject of his work.Struck's etchings of Eastern European Jews were published in "Das Ostjüdische Antlitz" (The Face of Eastern Jewry) in 1922 with an Essay by Arnold Zweig.  Zweig drew a romantic portrait of the eastern Jewish communities, which he viewed as authentic and vital. He hoped to persuade the German public to revise its mostly negative opinion of the displaced East European Jewish population that was pouring into Germany, resulting in acrimonious debates over the “Jewish question”Hermann Struck became a committed Zionist. He immigrated to Haifa where he created an artistic community and participated in the development of the Tel Aviv Museum and the Bezalel art school in Jerusalem.

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