Impressionists – Max Liebermann and Lesser Ury

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Liebermann, Max (1847-1935), Self-Portrait

Liebermann, Max (1847-1935), Self-Portrait

Born in Berlin. Max Liebermann trained in Weimar before continuing to study in Amsterdam and Paris, where he was influenced by Courbet, Millet, and the Barbizon School. Liebermann returned to Germany in 1878 and continued painting in the Impressionist style, founding the movement in his native country. In 1899, he helped found the Berlin Secession. He was a very influential figure in German art and was the dominant figure until the emergence of avant-garde art. He was the president of the Prussian Academy of Arts but resigned in 1933 because he was forbidden to paint because he was Jewish. Click to view all works (59) by Max Liebermann in DigiBaeck.

Ury, Lesser, 1861-1931, Self-Portrait, Pastel on Paper (1898)

Ury, Lesser, 1861-1931, Self-Portrait, Pastel on Paper (1898)

Lesser Ury's work was long overlooked, partly because his erstwhile friend Max Liebermann blocked his entry into the Berlin Secession after a bitter dispute ended their friendship. When Corinth succeeded Liebermann in 1911, Ury finally joined the Secession. This pastel was completed just one year after Ury moved to Berlin in 1897. Click to view works (5) by Lesser Ury in DigiBaeck.

Lady with Dog Crossing Street, Ury, Lesser, 1861-1931

Lady with Dog Crossing Street, Ury, Lesser, 1861-1931

This evocative image suggests nighttime in the metropolis Berlin and a street illuminated by lamplight.

The Cabbage Field (1923), Liebermann, Max, 1847-1935

The Cabbage Field (1923), Liebermann, Max, 1847-1935

The painting shows a figure bending over to attend the plants in a cabbage field, probably planted during WWI at the artist's summer house in Wannsee outside Berlin. The handling and colors are close to Impressionism, but the brushstrokes are wider than French impressionism.

Ury, Lesser, Lady in a Café, Drypoint, Ink on Paper (1919-1921)

Ury, Lesser, Lady in a Café, Drypoint, Ink on Paper (1919-1921)

Liebermann, Max,  To the Mothers of the Twelve Thousand, Print. Lithograph (ca. 1934)

Liebermann, Max, To the Mothers of the Twelve Thousand, Print. Lithograph (ca. 1934)

This poster bears the emblem R.J.F., for the sponsoring organization, "Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten" or National Organization of the Jewish Front-line Soldiers. The mothers of "The twelve thousand" refers to the Jewish soldiers killed during World War I, reminding Germans of the patriotism and sacrifices of German Jews, in light of the discrimination they were confronted with at the time under the Nazis.

Born in Berlin. Max Liebermann trained in Weimar before continuing to study in Amsterdam and Paris, where he was influenced by Courbet, Millet, and the Barbizon School. Liebermann returned to Germany in 1878 and continued painting in the Impressionist style, founding the movement in his native country. In 1899, he helped found the Berlin Secession. He was a very influential figure in German art and was the dominant figure until the emergence of avant-garde art. He was the president of the Prussian Academy of Arts but resigned in 1933 because he was forbidden to paint because he was Jewish.  Click to view all works (59) by Max Liebermann in DigiBaeck.Lesser Ury's work was long overlooked, partly because his erstwhile friend Max Liebermann blocked his entry into the Berlin Secession after a bitter dispute ended their friendship. When Corinth succeeded Liebermann in 1911, Ury finally joined the Secession. This pastel was completed just one year after Ury moved to Berlin in 1897. Click to view works (5) by Lesser Ury in DigiBaeck.This evocative image suggests nighttime in the metropolis Berlin and a street illuminated by lamplight.The painting shows a figure bending over to attend the plants in a cabbage field, probably planted during WWI at the artist's summer house in Wannsee outside Berlin.  The handling and colors are close to Impressionism, but the brushstrokes are wider than French impressionism.Ury, Lesser, Lady in a Café, Drypoint, Ink on Paper (1919-1921)This poster bears the emblem R.J.F., for the sponsoring organization, "Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten" or National Organization of the Jewish Front-line Soldiers. The mothers of "The twelve thousand" refers to the Jewish soldiers killed during World War I, reminding Germans of the patriotism and sacrifices of German Jews, in light of the discrimination they were confronted with at the time under the Nazis.

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