Sukkot in LBI Collections

Leo Baeck Institute will be closed on Thursday September 19 and Friday September 20 in observance of Sukkot and will close at 2pm on Wednesday, September 18 for Erev Sukkot. The staff at LBI wishes a good holiday to all and presents these images of Sukkot from DigiBaeck, Leo Baeck Institute’s digital collections.

Click on an image below to view related items in DigiBaeck

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor:

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor: "And ye shall take you on the first day of the fruit of goodly trees...." (Sukkot, Day 1)

The illustrator Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.

Dining room decorated for Sukkot; Home of Emil Wassermann until 1912; Zwinger 2, Bamberg (Album)

Dining room decorated for Sukkot; Home of Emil Wassermann until 1912; Zwinger 2, Bamberg (Album)

Emil Wassermann of the Wassermann banking family lived in this home in Bamberg's wealthiest district, where the dining room is pictured decorated for Sukkot. Emil was an uncle of the bacteriologist Paul August von Wassermann, who developed the first reliable test for Syphilis, which is still used today.

 Laubhuettenfest; Das Schmuecken der Laubhuette

Laubhuettenfest; Das Schmuecken der Laubhuette

This postcard from the Salfeld Postcard Collection shows a German-Jewish family decorating a Sukkah.

"Mahl in der Laubhuette" - (Meal in the Sukkah)

Men Carry Lulav and Etrog during Sukkot at the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in Frankfurt

Men Carry Lulav and Etrog during Sukkot at the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in Frankfurt

In 1853, conservative-minded Jewish families in Frankfurt joined the secessionist "Israelite Religious Society," in protest against contemporary reforms such as the introduction of organ music and mixed-gender choral singing to religious services. By the turn of the 20th century, the congregation was so numerous that it decided to build a new synagogue. With more than half the funds contributed from Baron Wilhelm Carl von Rothschild, the congregation completed the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in 1907, where the men in this undated picture are standing during Sukkot.

Picart, Bernard, (1673-1733) Plate III, Arba' Kanfot, Sabbath Lamp, Ma ot, Lulab, Etrog, Mezuzah, and Shofar, 1723

Picart, Bernard, (1673-1733) Plate III, Arba' Kanfot, Sabbath Lamp, Ma ot, Lulab, Etrog, Mezuzah, and Shofar, 1723

Bernard Picart, a French designer and engraver, created some of the earliest engravings on Jewish ecclesiastical and ceremonial subjects. This plate, published in the 16th century in Amsterdam, depicts Lulav and Etrog, two of the four species used during Sukkot.

Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723

Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723

Children at the Ahawah Orphanage Building a Sukkah

Children at the Ahawah Orphanage Building a Sukkah

Beate Berger, a nurse, founded the Beith Ahawah ("House of Love") orphanage in the former Jewish Hospital at Auguststrasse 14-16 in Berlin in 1922. By the early 1930's, the orphanage cared for over 100 children, mostly from Eastern Europe. After 1933, Berger worked to move the entire orphanage to Palestine, where it still exists today. LBI has about 185 photographs from the Beith Ahawah orphanage in its digital collections.

The illustrator Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.Emil Wassermann of the Wassermann banking family lived in this home in Bamberg's wealthiest district, where the dining room is pictured decorated for Sukkot. Emil was an uncle of the bacteriologist Paul August von Wassermann, who developed the first reliable test for Syphilis, which is still used today.This postcard from the Salfeld Postcard Collection shows a German-Jewish family decorating a Sukkah."Mahl in der Laubhuette" - (Meal in the Sukkah)In 1853, conservative-minded Jewish families in Frankfurt joined the secessionist "Israelite Religious Society," in protest against contemporary reforms such as the introduction of organ music and mixed-gender choral singing to religious services.  By the turn of the 20th century, the congregation was so numerous that it decided to build a new synagogue. With more than half the funds contributed from Baron Wilhelm Carl von Rothschild, the congregation completed the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in 1907, where the men in this undated picture are standing during Sukkot.Bernard Picart, a French designer and engraver, created some of the earliest engravings on Jewish ecclesiastical and ceremonial subjects.  This plate, published in the 16th century in Amsterdam, depicts Lulav and Etrog, two of the four species used during Sukkot.Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723Beate Berger, a nurse, founded the Beith Ahawah ("House of Love") orphanage in the former Jewish Hospital at Auguststrasse 14-16 in Berlin in 1922. By the early 1930's, the orphanage cared for over 100 children, mostly from Eastern Europe. After 1933, Berger worked to move the entire orphanage to Palestine, where it still exists today. LBI has about 185 photographs from the Beith Ahawah orphanage in its digital collections.

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