Haggadot from LBI Collections

In observance of Passover, the Leo Baeck Institute will close early Monday, April 14 at 2:00 pm and will remain closed Tuesday, April 15 and Wednesday, April 16. We will again be closing early at 2:00 pm Sunday, April 20, and will remain closed Monday, April 21 and Tuesday, April 22. The staff at LBI wishes a good holiday to all and presents highlights from of our collection of Pesach Haggadot.

Haggadah des Kindes, (Children’s Haggadah) Berlin, 1933

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

The entire book has been digitized and can be viewed online.

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933.

The final illustration, with the title “Next Year in Jerusalem”, is an idyllic scene of children on a farm in Palestine. Emil Bernhard Cohn whose son, Rabbi Bernhard Cohn, was for many years the Rabbi of Congregation Habonim in New York emigrated to the United States in 1939.

Many families still use an English adaptation of this book.  This Haggadah was donated to Leo Baeck Institute by Marianne Salinger.

Offenbacher Haggadah, Offenbach am Main, 1927

The Offenbach Haggadah was commissioned by Dr. Siegfried Guggenheim (1873-1961) an attorney and avid collector of rare books in Offenbach, near Frankfurt. The type designer Rudolf Koch created new fonts and the painter Fritz Kredel, a student of Koch’s, illustrated the new Haggadah inspired by the first Offenbach Haggadah which was printed in 1772. The Klingspor brothers  published the new version in 1927, in a bibliophile edition of 300 copies. Guggenheim translated the Hebrew text into German, provided the transliterations of the Hebrew blessings and also inserted a novelty into the service. Instead of ending with “next year in Jerusalem, the Offenbach Haggadah concludes with the words: “next year in Worms on the Rhine, our home.”  The author, we assume, was probably expelled with the Jews from Brünn in 1454, and here in his old age, he gives moving expression to his longing for the home he was forced to leave in his youth. This kind of conscious reinterpretation of the formerly intended meaning is not unusual. In the house of their parents in Worms, children traditionally called out with joyous voices “leshana haba b’ Worms am Rhein.” “Next year in Worms, our home.”

The entire book has been digitized and can be viewed online.

Fritz Kredel's illustration of Pharoah's army in the Red Sea.  The Offenbacher Haggadah, Published by Dr. Siegfried Guggenheim, Offenbach am Main, 1927

Fritz Kredel’s illustration of Pharoah’s army in the Red Sea.  The Offenbacher Haggadah, Published by Dr. Siegfried Guggenheim, Offenbach am Main, 1927

Leo Baeck Institute has digitized Siegfried Guggenheim’s archival collection, which includes extensive materials about the Offenbach Haggadah, including his correspondence with artists and designers and the original printing blocks.

Hagadah Shel Pesah, Amsterdam, 1711

This Haggadah was published in Amsterdam around 1711. In addition to woodcut initials, this volume contains beautiful engravings illustrating scenes from the Haggadah.

This Haggadah was published in Amsterdam around 1711. In addition to woodcut initials, this volume contains beautiful engravings illustrating scenes from the Haggadah.

This Haggadah was published in Amsterdam around 1711. In addition to woodcut initials, this volume contains beautiful engravings illustrating scenes from the Haggadah.

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