Exhibitions

Exhibition: Facing History: Portraits from the LBI Art Collection

Artist unknown. Unidentified mother and daughter. Germany, mid-19th century.

At the core of LBI’s Art Collection are well over 1,000 portraits of Jews from Central Europe that reflect the changing cultural dynamics from the 18th century to the 20th century.

New Exhibition on Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany held in Ambassador’s Residence

(© Germany.info / Zacarias Garcia)

On Monday, March 17, Ambassador Peter Ammon hosted the opening of a new Leo Baeck Institute exhibition at his residence. “Advancing Modernity: Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany, 1919-1933″ was curated by the Leo Baeck Institute from its extensive collection of personal papers, books and other artifacts. The exhibit features the outstanding achievements of several Jewish…

Jewish Vienna: Opportunities and Innovations

A man and woman view theater listings on an advertising column in front of the Burgtheater in Vienna (c. 1905-1914). Emil Mayer (1871-1938)

Leo Baeck Institute focuses on the Jewish contribution to cultural life in Vienna. Extended through June 8, 2014.

Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture

Meyer Elkan Fürth
Sefer yir’at shamayim [The Book of Fear of Heaven] Dessau, 1820

Before the emancipation, learned Jews used mathematics primarily as a tool for calculating the Jewish calendar.  As opportunities opened for Jews in German academia, Jewish mathematicians became leaders in the field.

A wealth of pictures and documents trace many moving lives: young researchers who helped shape modern mathematics and physics, scholars who went beyond mathematics and made their mark in literature or philosophy, and the story of the most important female mathematician of the 20th century.

LBI Focuses on Mendelssohn Family in Exhibit at German Ambassador’s Residence

A panel from the exhibition shows some descendants of Moses Mendelssohn

German Ambassador Peter Ammon hosted the opening of a new Leo Baeck Institute exhibition at his residence. “The Mendelssohns: A German Family of Scholars, Bankers, and Artists” was curated by the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) from its extensive collection of personal papers, books and other artifacts.

Beer, Art and Revolution: Jewish Life in Munich, 1806 – the present

Julius W. Schülein, "Main Synagogue and Frauenkirche", water color, c. 1920

This exhibit shows how Jews were instrumental in shaping the traditions and character of Germany’s third largest city, from Löwenbräu beer to the city’s champion soccer club.

Destination Shanghai: The Jewish Community of Shanghai, 1936-1949

David L. Bloch, Self Portrait in a Rickshaw, watercolor, 1943

On view through April 14, 2013 at the Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz
Between 1936 and 1949 Shanghai was the last refuge to 20,000 German and Austrian Jews, who flocked to the only place in the world that didn’t require a visa.

“Faith in Reason” Exhibit Highlights Jewish Scientists at German Ambassador’s Residence

© Germany.info / by J. DeTiege

Leo Baeck Institute unveiled a new exhibit at the residence of German Ambassador Peter Ammon in Washington, DC that highlights the extraordinary contributions of German Jews in the fields of natural science, mathematics and medicine.

Moses Mendelssohn: Conversation and the Legacy of the Enlightenment

Moses Mendelssohn Title Panel

The towering figure of the Jewish Enlightenment was a short, humpbacked son of a Torah scribe from the rural German hamlet of Dessau, who rose to become an internationally renowned Enlightenment philosopher while remaining an observant Jew who defended Judaism and advocated for Jewish civil rights. Explore his life and work through images and links to digitized books.

Leo Baeck Salon Explores the Logistics of Memory in Berlin

Luca Vanello's "Memory Pill" consists of a single photograph, disintegrated and compressed into a gelatin capsule, offering to bring the observer back to a specific moment and memory.

At the 9th Leo Baeck Salon, seventeen young artists transformed shipping containers in an industrial Berlin neighborhood into art spaces with sculptures inspired by LBI collections. The artists, all students in Gregor Schneider’s sculpture class at the Berlin University of the Arts, engaged with LBI archives at the Jewish Musuem in Berlin.