People

Gerald Westheimer: A Vision for Scholarship on German-Jewish History

Gerald Westheimer on his first day of school in Berlin at the age of six and at his home in Berkeley, California in 2015.

Gerald Westheimer, born 1924 in Berlin, established the Gerald Westheimer Career Development Fellowship in 2008 to support scholarship on the history and culture of German-speaking Jews by offering financial support to recent PhDs early in their faculty careers.

Michael Brenner Recognized as “Guardian of Jewish History”

Michael Brenner (l) with German Federal Justice Minister Heiko Maas. Photo, Emily Andresini.

On November 19, 2015 at the Center for Jewish History, German Justice Minister Heiko Maas presented LBI International President Michael Brenner with the Federal Order of Merit, (Verdienstkreuz am Bande) praising the historian as a guardian of Jewish history and an important supporter of Jewish life in Germany and worldwide.

Understanding through Cooperation: Germany Honors Carol Kahn Strauss

Carol Kahn Strauss (c) with her husband, Peter Strauss, and German Consul General Brita Wagener. Photo, Celia Rogge.

On January 20, 2015, LBI International Director Carol Kahn Strauss was presented the Commander´s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany by Consul General Brita Wagener. The decoration was awarded in appreciation of her outstanding accomplishments and commitment to German-American-Jewish relations for more than two decades.

Leo Baeck Medal for Josef Joffe

Josef Joffe (r) with Henry Kissinger. Photo by Christina Domingues.

The German journalist accepted the honor at LBI’s Annual Award Dinner at the Center for Jewish History on December 3, 2014 and delivered the 57th Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture, in which he weighed the possibility that a new golden age of German-Jewry might arise again.

Gerald Westheimer Career Development Fellows

Moritz Steinschneider

Thanks to the generosity of Professor Gerald Westheimer, LBI has supported fellowships for scholars who are early in their careers to pursue research on the social, cultural, and academic aspects of the life of Jews in German-speaking countries between the time of Moses Mendelssohn and the Third Reich and its aftermath. LBI is proud to…

Josef Joffe on the “Golden Age” of German-speaking Jewry

Josef Joffe. Photo by Vera Tammen

Josef Joffe is the editor of Germany’s largest weekly newspaper, Die Zeit, and one of the most influential voices on international affairs today. On December 3, 2014, he will deliver the 57th annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture and accept the Leo Baeck Medal. His Lecture will be titled, The Golden Age of German Jewry, 1871…

Erhard Roy Wiehn— “Wer schreibt, der bleibt!”

Erhard Roy Wiehn is the editor of the Edition Schoah und Judaica

Erhard Roy Wiehn, born 1937 in Saarbrücken, is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Constance. His “Edition Schoah und Judaica,” is one of the largest series of monographs about Jewish life in Europe and now encompasses nearly 280 books, mostly autobiographical accounts of Jewish life in Europe before, during, and after the Holocaust. We spoke to him about memory, authenticity, and obsession.

Jerry Brotman—Hands-on Volunteer

Jerry Brotman while barcoding books in the LBI library stacks.

He is neither a scholar nor a librarian, but Jerry Brotman knows the LBI Library Collection more intimately than anyone else. Over the past eight years, Brotman affixed barcodes to some 66,000 books, a labor as important to the functioning of a library as it is, some might say, tedious. In 2014, he claimed the singular distinction of being the only person in history to lay hands on every cataloged monograph in the Library’s 80,000-volume collection.

Gaby Glueckselig: Stammtisch Hostess Celebrates a Century of Bliss

Glueckselig celebrates her 100th birthday at Leo Baeck Institute.

Gaby Glueckselig came to the Leo Baeck Institute in the late 1980s as a volunteer archivist. For years she helped to preserve German-Jewish culture by cataloging the Institute’s extensive photograph collection. On April 27, 2014, Glueckselig returned to LBI to celebrate her 100th birthday with friends and family.

Research Profile: Michaela Raggam- Blesch on “Half-Jews” in Vienna, 1938–1945

Kurt Kelman and Gusti Dressler pose in front of a sign reading “Juden verboten!”
(Jews forbidden), at the Augarten Park in Vienna. Summer 1938.
Kurt Kelman Collection, AR 11292

Michaela Raggam-Blesch When I was conducting oral history interviews for the project “Topography of the Shoah in Vienna” in 2010, I met a number of interview partners who had survived the entire war in Vienna as so-called “half-Jews.” Though they ultimately escaped the Nazi genocide, they had lived in the most precarious circumstances in wartime…