Events by location: Center for Jewish History

There Was Once... 2011, Directed by Gábor Kálmán

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The second of two films screened in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of nationwide Jewish deportations in Hungary, There Was Once… documents the contemporary struggles of a Hungarian high school teacher who sparks controversy by uncovering the Jewish past of her small town, Kalocsa.

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Free Fall

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Acclaimed director Péter Forgács explores the unique circumstances of the Holocaust in southern Hungary in his intimate film Free Fall, told through the home videos of a Jewish family in the 1940s. Forgács will introduce the film and join us for a post-screening discussion and reception.

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During a house cleaning in 1988, a sensational diary was found, which gave new insight into Sigmund Freud’s working method. Actors Graziella Rossi and Tom Regan vividly capture Freud’s fascinating sessions with the young doctor Anna G. in this 45-minute staged reading.

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Over the past six months, LBI has conducted a survey of Jewish-related archives in Bukovina and Transylvania, two formerly German-speaking regions of Romania. At this launch event for the survey’s online catalog, field archivists Julie Dawson and Ryan Mendenhall will be joined by historian Dr. Leo Spitzer in discussing the project’s development and implementation, as…

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Join us for a lively discussion of how the features of three distinct cities provided settings for the flowering of Jewish cultural and intellectual life.

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The sustained loyalty of the Jewish electorate to the Democratic party while other ethnic voters cast their ballots elsewhere has long puzzled political pundits and chagrined Republican stalwarts. Yet efforts to turn the Jewish vote have thus far failed. The majority of Jewish voters continue to pull down the democratic voting lever as if guided…

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Edgar Georg Ulmer (1904 – 1972) was an Austrian-American film director. He is best remembered for the movies The Black Cat (1934) and Detour (1945).

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Long overshadowed by the more celebrated careers of fellow Austrian- and German-born Jewish émigré filmmakers, Edgar G. Ulmer’s work is now finally receiving a new wave of critical appreciation more than four decades after his death. This event marks the publication of Noah Isenberg’s new biography – Edgar G. Ulmer: A Filmmaker at the Margins…

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Jewish immigrants played a central role in transforming San Francisco from a sleepy village to a thriving metropolis. In the process they reinvented themselves as well, becoming a distinctly new kind of Jew – a San Francisco Jew.

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Join us in honoring Ambassador Stuart Eizenstat, who will accept the Leo Baeck Medal and deliver the 56th Annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture during a special evening at the Center for Jewish History in New York City.

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W. Michael Blumenthal escaped from Nazi Germany and became a leading business executive, Secretary of the Treasury , director of the Jewish Museum Belrin, and Leo Baeck Medal winner. He will discuss his extraordinary new memoir at Leo Baeck Institute.

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