Gaby Glueckselig: Stammtisch Hostess Celebrates a Century of Bliss

Glueckselig celebrates her 100th birthday at Leo Baeck Institute.

Gaby Glueckselig came to the Leo Baeck Institute in the late 1980s as a volunteer archivist. For years she helped to preserve German-Jewish culture by cataloging the Institute’s extensive photograph collection. On April 27, 2014, Glueckselig returned to LBI to celebrate her 100th birthday with friends and family.

Conservation of the Fürth Megillah

The Fürth Megillah drying under tension during conservation efforts at the CJH. Fürth Jewish Community Collection, AR 994

This colorfully illustrated Megillah from Fürth originated in the 18th century, when Jews comprised a fifth to a quarter of the city’s population and enjoyed freedoms unheard of elsewhere in Bavaria. Felicity Corkill, a conservator at the Center for Jewish History, describes how she prepared this treasure for public display at the CJH during Purim in 2014.

New Exhibition on Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany held in Ambassador’s Residence

(© Germany.info / Zacarias Garcia)

On Monday, March 17, Ambassador Peter Ammon hosted the opening of a new Leo Baeck Institute exhibition at his residence. “Advancing Modernity: Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany, 1919-1933″ was curated by the Leo Baeck Institute from its extensive collection of personal papers, books and other artifacts. The exhibit features the outstanding achievements of several Jewish…

Library: Sparrow Makes her Way

Samson, Meta and L. Szkolny (illus). Spatz macht sich. Berlin: Jüdischer Buchverlag, 1938.

“Wishing that you may make your own way just like this ‘sparrow.’ Love, Evi, your Aunt Becker. Cologne, Rosh Hashanah 5699,” reads the inscription in this slender volume. The sparrow (in German, “Spatz”) in the inscription refers to the title character of the book, Spatz Macht Sich (Sparrow Makes her Way). This children’s novel by…

Research Profile: Michaela Raggam- Blesch on “Half-Jews” in Vienna, 1938–1945

Kurt Kelman and Gusti Dressler pose in front of a sign reading “Juden verboten!”
(Jews forbidden), at the Augarten Park in Vienna. Summer 1938.
Kurt Kelman Collection, AR 11292

Michaela Raggam-Blesch When I was conducting oral history interviews for the project “Topography of the Shoah in Vienna” in 2010, I met a number of interview partners who had survived the entire war in Vienna as so-called “half-Jews.” Though they ultimately escaped the Nazi genocide, they had lived in the most precarious circumstances in wartime…

What’s in a Name? Dennis Baum and the Simson Company

LBI Trustee Dennis Baum in 2014.

Dennis Baum fought for restitution of his family’s assets in Germany for years following German reunification in 1990. In January, Baum joined his former negotiating partners in a public forum at the Jewish Museum Berlin to discuss what went wrong 20 years ago. The records of the Simson Company and the case of its restitution…

Jerry Lindenstraus: Sprechen Trotz Allem

Jerry Lindenstraus talks to German school pupils at the headquarters of the
Schwarzkopf Stiftung in Berlin in December 2013.

Over six-feet tall, impressively agile for his 84 years, and sharply dressed, long-time LBI volunteer Jerry Lindenstraus cuts a striking figure. His faintly continental accent leads many people he meets to ask him where he’s from. That’s not such an easy question to answer. “When I tell them that I lived in Danzig, most people…

Donation of Biochemist’s Library a Case Study in Provenance & Restitution

Provenance markings that proved that these books belonged to Carl Neuberg. In the lower right hand corner, a piece of paper has been pasted over Neuberg’s name and address.

The LBI Library has been enriched by 40 volumes of scientific literature from the former library of Carl Neuberg (1877–1956), a pioneer in the study of biochemistry. This donation, the result of restitution efforts by the Central and Regional Library of Berlin (Zentral- und Landesbibliothek Berlin – ZLB), is an emblematic case study in the complexities of provenance research and the restitution of looted cultural works.

Database of German Exile Publishers Now Online

Some of the distinctive logos of German exile publishers : Row 1 (l-r) Europäischer  Merkur, Paris; El Libro Libre, Mexico City; Humanitas, Zürich; Tarshish, Jerusalem;  Row 2 (l-r) Eugen Prager, Prague/Bratislava; Alliance Book Corporation, New York;  Malik, Prague/London; Pantheon, New York; Row 3 (l-r) Querido, Amsterdam/ Jakarta; Aurora Verlag, New York; Bermann-Fischer, Vienna/Stockholm; Bruno  Cassirer, Oxford.

LBI Library and Archives staff have built an online database of publishing houses founded by German-speaking refugees outside the German Reich and occupied Europe between 1933 and 1945. The new portal gives LBI’s substantial collection of Exilliteratur a higher profile and aids in the discovery of a body of work that is not otherwise linked…

Apply for Gerald Westheimer Career Development Fellowship by March 15

Moritz Steinschneider writing at his desk

The deadline to apply for LBI’s Gerald Westheimer Career Development Fellowship has been extended to March 15, 2014.  The Leo Baeck Institute is offering a Career Development Award as a personal grant to a scholar or professional in an early career stage, e.g. before gaining tenure in an academic institution or its equivalent, whose proposed…