Sukkot in LBI Collections

Leo Baeck Institute will be closed on Thursday, October 9 and Friday, October, 10 in observance of Sukkot and will close at 2pm on Wednesday, October 8 for Erev Sukkot. The staff at LBI wishes a good holiday to all and presents these images of Sukkot from DigiBaeck, Leo Baeck Institute’s digital collections.

2014 Holiday Schedule

Click on an image below to view related items in DigiBaeck

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor:

Hugo Steiner Prag - Design for a Machzor: "And ye shall take you on the first day of the fruit of goodly trees...." (Sukkot, Day 1)

The illustrator Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.

Dining room decorated for Sukkot; Home of Emil Wassermann until 1912; Zwinger 2, Bamberg (Album)

Dining room decorated for Sukkot; Home of Emil Wassermann until 1912; Zwinger 2, Bamberg (Album)

Emil Wassermann of the Wassermann banking family lived in this home in Bamberg's wealthiest district, where the dining room is pictured decorated for Sukkot. Emil was an uncle of the bacteriologist Paul August von Wassermann, who developed the first reliable test for Syphilis, which is still used today.

 Laubhuettenfest; Das Schmuecken der Laubhuette

Laubhuettenfest; Das Schmuecken der Laubhuette

This postcard from the Salfeld Postcard Collection shows a German-Jewish family decorating a Sukkah.

"Mahl in der Laubhuette" - (Meal in the Sukkah)

Men Carry Lulav and Etrog during Sukkot at the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in Frankfurt

Men Carry Lulav and Etrog during Sukkot at the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in Frankfurt

In 1853, conservative-minded Jewish families in Frankfurt joined the secessionist "Israelite Religious Society," in protest against contemporary reforms such as the introduction of organ music and mixed-gender choral singing to religious services. By the turn of the 20th century, the congregation was so numerous that it decided to build a new synagogue. With more than half the funds contributed from Baron Wilhelm Carl von Rothschild, the congregation completed the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in 1907, where the men in this undated picture are standing during Sukkot.

Picart, Bernard, (1673-1733) Plate III, Arba' Kanfot, Sabbath Lamp, Ma ot, Lulab, Etrog, Mezuzah, and Shofar, 1723

Picart, Bernard, (1673-1733) Plate III, Arba' Kanfot, Sabbath Lamp, Ma ot, Lulab, Etrog, Mezuzah, and Shofar, 1723

Bernard Picart, a French designer and engraver, created some of the earliest engravings on Jewish ecclesiastical and ceremonial subjects. This plate, published in the 16th century in Amsterdam, depicts Lulav and Etrog, two of the four species used during Sukkot.

Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723

Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723

Children at the Ahawah Orphanage Building a Sukkah

Children at the Ahawah Orphanage Building a Sukkah

Beate Berger, a nurse, founded the Beith Ahawah ("House of Love") orphanage in the former Jewish Hospital at Auguststrasse 14-16 in Berlin in 1922. By the early 1930's, the orphanage cared for over 100 children, mostly from Eastern Europe. After 1933, Berger worked to move the entire orphanage to Palestine, where it still exists today. LBI has about 185 photographs from the Beith Ahawah orphanage in its digital collections.

The illustrator Hugo-Steiner-Prag was commissioned in 1936 by the Czech industrialist Jírí Waldes to design a Machzor (prayer book) to be printed in the Czech language. By 1937, Steiner-Prag had completed the drawings but the threat of Nazi occupation had become too acute to contemplate the publication. Mr. Waldes returned the sketches to Steiner-Prag, who took them with him into exile in New York.Emil Wassermann of the Wassermann banking family lived in this home in Bamberg's wealthiest district, where the dining room is pictured decorated for Sukkot. Emil was an uncle of the bacteriologist Paul August von Wassermann, who developed the first reliable test for Syphilis, which is still used today.This postcard from the Salfeld Postcard Collection shows a German-Jewish family decorating a Sukkah."Mahl in der Laubhuette" - (Meal in the Sukkah)In 1853, conservative-minded Jewish families in Frankfurt joined the secessionist "Israelite Religious Society," in protest against contemporary reforms such as the introduction of organ music and mixed-gender choral singing to religious services.  By the turn of the 20th century, the congregation was so numerous that it decided to build a new synagogue. With more than half the funds contributed from Baron Wilhelm Carl von Rothschild, the congregation completed the Friedberger Anlage Neue Synagogue in 1907, where the men in this undated picture are standing during Sukkot.Bernard Picart, a French designer and engraver, created some of the earliest engravings on Jewish ecclesiastical and ceremonial subjects.  This plate, published in the 16th century in Amsterdam, depicts Lulav and Etrog, two of the four species used during Sukkot.Plate VII: Top: Sukkot, Procession of the Palms and Bottom: The Sukkot Meal, 1723Beate Berger, a nurse, founded the Beith Ahawah ("House of Love") orphanage in the former Jewish Hospital at Auguststrasse 14-16 in Berlin in 1922. By the early 1930's, the orphanage cared for over 100 children, mostly from Eastern Europe. After 1933, Berger worked to move the entire orphanage to Palestine, where it still exists today. LBI has about 185 photographs from the Beith Ahawah orphanage in its digital collections.

Holiday Closure: Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah

Parading with the torah scrolls outside a synagogue; Washington Heights, New York City. Kurt Goldschmidt Collection. AR 5628, undated photo.

Leo Baeck Institute will close Thursday, October 16 and Friday, October 17, 2014 in observance of Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah.

Leo Baeck Institute Annual Award Dinner Honoring Dr. Josef Joffe

Dr. Josef Joffe. Photo: Vera Tammen

On December 3, 2014, Dr. Henry A. Kissinger will present the Leo Baeck Medal to Dr. Josef Joffe, who will also deliver the 57th Annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture during LBI’s Annual Award Dinner at the Center for Jewish History in New York City.

LBI News No. 95 — Summer 2014

LBI_Summer14News_Final_Page_01

In this issue, Federal President Joachim Gauck of Germany accepts the Leo Baeck Medal at LBI’s first award Dinner in Berlin. CJH Conservator Felicity Corkill discusses her work cleaning and repairing a delicate 18th century megillah, and LBI archivists and librarians test out some recipes from the many cookbooks in the library collection.

Mahlzeit! German-Jewish Cuisine in LBI Collections

A plate from, Morgenstern, Lina. Illustriertes Universal-Kochbuch für Gesunde und Kranke. Berlin. 1907.

As anyone who has traveled abroad knows, food is one of the most important aspects of culture. Many a journey, and a good bit of global trade, was launched in search of new flavors. For the displaced, uprooted, or simply homesick, familiar foods provide a comfort and connection to home that is second perhaps only…

Federal President of Germany, Joachim Gauck, Awarded Leo Baeck Medal in Berlin

Federal President Joachim Gauck accepts the Leo Baeck Medal on May 14, 2014 in Berlin.

On May 14, 2014, LBI President Dr. Ronald B. Sobel presented the Leo Baeck Medal to the Federal President of Germany, Joachim Gauck. It was the first time LBI awarded its highest honor in Berlin, at a dinner to mark the opening of an LBI New York office in the German capital.

Lene Schneider-Kainer: Diary of an Incredible Journey Translated into English

A portrait of Lene Schneider-Kainer.

The year she turned 41, Lene Schneider-Kainer divorced her husband, closed her fledgling business selling designer lingerie to upper class Berlin ladies, and embarked on an 18-month journey to the near East, India, Southeast Asia, and China. Jewish publishing pioneer Rudolf Mosse’s liberal daily, the “Berliner Tageblatt,” had hired Schneider-Kainer to illustrate dispatches from an epic journey along the route traveled by Marco Polo in 1271.

Honoring Federal President Joachim Gauck

Federal President Gauck (l) and Dr. Ronald B. Sobel. Photo: Michael Fahrig.

On May 14, 2014, Joachim Gauck, Federal President of Germany, accepted the Leo Baeck Medal. LBI President Dr. Ronald Sobel made the following remarks at LBI’s first Award Dinner in Berlin, held to honor Gauck.

LBI at Limmud Germany

At Limmud Germany, workshops were presented in German, Russian, and English, a mix that reflects the diverse backgrounds of the participants. Photo: Nathan Frank.

Limmud Germany held its seventh annual festival at a resort outside Berlin from May 29–June 1, 2014. About 400 participants attended workshops that spanned topics from Hebrew language, Jewish cuisine and a workshop by Dr. Frank Mecklenburg of LBI which covered the topic of German-Jewish history before 1933.

Wikipedians Write the Book on LBI Collections

“If you don’t think Wikipedia is good enough, create an account and make it better!” —Leonora Lange, CJH Archivist

At the first public CJH Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Saturday, May 4, 2014, about 30 volunteers, including CJH and LBI staff, members of the local NYC Wikimedia Chapter, and scholars and librarians from other institutions spent an afternoon creating and improving Wikipedia articles related to women in Jewish History.