Heim des Jüdischen Frauenbundes Neu-Isenburg. Feiertags-Küchenkalender für die jüdische Hausfrau. c. 1910.

Feiertagsküchenkalender für die Jüdische Hausfrau

As described in this Holiday Cookbook for Jewish Women, the Home of the Jewish Women’s League in Neu-Isenburg was a safe haven for pregnant women and mothers, children (legitimate and illegitimate), and displaced young women; it offered these women education and training in a traditional Jewish environment and family-like setting.

Elias, Julie. Das Neue Kochbuch. 1925

Elias, Julie. Das neue kochbuch Ein führer durch die feine küche. Berlin: Ullstein, 1925.

Julie Elias was a fashion journalist living in Berlin with her art historian husband, Julias Elias. She published reviews and commentary on current fashions of the Weimar period in both mainstream and Jewish publications. In 1925 she branched out to create Das Neue Kochbuch or “The New Cookbook.” This book was aimed at Jewish housewives.

Ruth Heimann’s “Angel Pie”

Ruth Heimann's Angel Pie from "Recipes Remembered"

This pie from a cookbook published by the largely German-Jewish Congregation Habonim in New York in 1976, is made of beaten egg whites and mixed with crushed Ritz crackers and pecans. It was contributed by the late Ruth Heimann, a long-time LBI volunteer.

Trout with Mushroom Sauce

Fish simmering with lemon, ginger, bay leaf, parsley and other spices.

This whole fish simmered with lemons, parsley and other spices comes from Bertha Gumprich’s aptly titled “Complete Practical Cookbook for the Jewish Kitchen,” a compendium of culinary knowledge first published in 1896.

Weißbiersuppe mit Grieß | Wheat Beer Soup with Semolina

Ingredients for Wheat Beer Soup include Semolina and Beer.

This recipe for “Weißbiersuppe mit Gries” (wheat or white beer soup with semolina) is from from the ninth edition of Rebekka Wolf’s Kochbuch für israelitische Frauen is a good way to get rid of unfinished beer, but there are no instructions for how to get rid of left-over beer soup.

Haggadot from LBI Collections

AM Silbermann and Emil Bernhard Cohn edited this “Children’s Haggadah” in Berlin in 1933. Intended to involve children in the seder, it features “moving picture” illustrations by Erwin Singer. Children are invited to “pull slowly” on tabs connected to inserts in the illustrations, which move to reveal hidden elements of the pictures. The book also contains songs by the composer Arno Nadel (who served as Choir Director of the Jewish Community in Berlin) and other contemporary artists.

In observance of Passover, the Leo Baeck Institute will be closing early Monday, April 14 at 2:00 pm and will remain closed Tuesday, April 15 and Wednesday, April 16. We will again be closing early at 2:00 pm Sunday, April 20, and will remain closed Monday, April 21 and Tuesday, April 22. The staff at LBI wishes a good holiday to all and presents a highlight of our collection of Pesach Haggadot.

New Exhibition on Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany held in Ambassador’s Residence

(© Germany.info / Zacarias Garcia)

On Monday, March 17, Ambassador Peter Ammon hosted the opening of a new Leo Baeck Institute exhibition at his residence. “Advancing Modernity: Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany, 1919-1933″ was curated by the Leo Baeck Institute from its extensive collection of personal papers, books and other artifacts. The exhibit features the outstanding achievements of several Jewish…

Archives: Hoerlin Collection Combines Intrigue, Alpinism, and Physics

Folders from the Hoerlin collection. Visible are correspondence between Käte and Hermann Hoerlin, Herman Hoerlin’s reports on the observation of nuclear tests from space, and a hand-drawn map of a region in Germany. AR 25540

The Kate and Herman Hoerlin Collection, recently added to the LBI Archives, contains the papers of a couple whose lives took a dramatic course shaped by events as diverse as the Rohm Putsch, a German expedition in the Himalayas, and US nuclear testing in Los Alamos. Kate Tietz was born to a Jewish family but…

Library: Sparrow Makes her Way

Samson, Meta and L. Szkolny (illus). Spatz macht sich. Berlin: Jüdischer Buchverlag, 1938.

“Wishing that you may make your own way just like this ‘sparrow.’ Love, Evi, your Aunt Becker. Cologne, Rosh Hashanah 5699,” reads the inscription in this slender volume. The sparrow (in German, “Spatz”) in the inscription refers to the title character of the book, Spatz Macht Sich (Sparrow Makes her Way). This children’s novel by…

Research Profile: Michaela Raggam- Blesch on “Half-Jews” in Vienna, 1938–1945

Kurt Kelman and Gusti Dressler pose in front of a sign reading “Juden verboten!”
(Jews forbidden), at the Augarten Park in Vienna. Summer 1938.
Kurt Kelman Collection, AR 11292

Michaela Raggam-Blesch When I was conducting oral history interviews for the project “Topography of the Shoah in Vienna” in 2010, I met a number of interview partners who had survived the entire war in Vienna as so-called “half-Jews.” Though they ultimately escaped the Nazi genocide, they had lived in the most precarious circumstances in wartime…