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Stolen Heart: The Theft of Jewish Property in Berlin’s Historic Center, 1933–1945

"Stolen Heart" is on view March 29 – October 2016 at the Center for Jewish History.

March 29 – October 2016 A new exhibit shows how Jews helped make Berlin’s central district, Mitte, the vibrant center of culture and commerce it was by the late 19th century, and how the expropriation of Jewish-owned businesses and real estate left wounds that have yet to heal.

Burning Words: The Battle of the Books

Michael Wolgemut, The Burning of the Jews during the Time of the Plague (Schedels Weltchronik), woodcut, 1493

Extended through June 3, 2016 Not long after the invention of the printing press, one of the first public debates carried out on the new medium of the printed page concerned whether the people of the book should be allowed any of their books at all. An exhibition of extremely rare volumes from the period reveals strains of zealous antisemitism as well as the beginnings of an enlightened Humanism.

Meine Liebe Käthe—A trove of century-old letters adds fuel to WWI debate

Letters from Kurt Riezler to Käthe Liebermann written in the early months of WWI. AR 25484

Engagement letters from a young Bavarian Catholic aid to the German Chancellor and the daughter of one of early 20th century Germany’s most famous painters speak volumes about the German-Jewish milieu in Wilhelmine Berlin and may also shed light on the origins of World War I.

Just Passing Through, but Taking a Stand—Jewish Student Politics in Vienna, 1967–1975

Hermann Teifer was born 1949 in Vienna and studied Theater, Philosophy, Political Science, and Jewish Studies at the University of Vienna, where he earned his doctorate in 1975. He worked as a freelance author in Jerusalem and New York and raised two sons. After his sons left home he studied library science at Queens College and joined LBI as an archivist in 2008.

Hermann Teifer The University of Vienna celebrates its 650th anniversary this year, and the city’s Jewish Museum is marking the occasion with an exhibition that explores the long and tumultuous relationship between Jews and the University. After the expulsion of the Jews from Vienna in 1421, the rubble of the old synagogue was used to…

More than Just a Moment—Unlocking the Value of the LBI Photo Collection

Friedl Roth with an unidentified
man, 1920s
Joseph Roth Collection, AR 1764

Austrian writer Josef Roth carried dozens of snapshots of his estranged wife, Friederike (Friedl), 
among his few possessions until he died in a Paris hospital for the indigent in 1939. In the 
mid-1920s, Friedl began to manifest symptoms of schizophrenia, and she was eventually 
institutionalized, plunging Josef into an alcoholic crisis of his own. Josef paid for her stays in 
a series of private sanatoria until he was no longer able, and Friedl was murdered by the Nazi 
euthanasia program at Schloss Hartheim in Austria in 1940.
The snapshots in Roth’s archival collection show an outwardly happy couple traveling around Europe 
during the period when Josef was a star correspondent
for the Frankfurter Zeitung.

LBI recently launched an initiative to improve access to historic photographs in order to keep pace with evolving standards.

Preservation in the LBI Library

Threads in a sewn binding

Caring for a library of over 80,000 physical volumes is a hands-on job, according to Lauren Paustian, an associate librarian who handles many of the LBI Library’s preservation efforts.