Events by type: Book Presentation

Kurt Tucholsky is one of Weimar Germany’s most celebrated literary figures, loved by his many readers and hated by the Nazis. A forthcoming re-issue of long out-of-print English translations by Harry Zohn will re-introduce Tucholsky’s satirical masterpieces to today’s readers.

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Representatives of the German Justice Ministry and the authors of a new study on the involvement of former Nazis in the ministry’s early post-war history will discuss the role of the judiciary in the development and preservation of democracy.

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Through a close reading of key paintings and by a discussion of his many cultural networks across Germany and throughout Europe, this new study by Marion Deshmukh illuminates the painter Max Liebermann’s importance as a pioneer of German modernism.

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Supported by more than two hundred photographs, the second volume of Andras Koerner’s history, “How They Lived – The Everyday Lives of Hungarian Jews, 1867-1940” shows how the diverse groups of Hungarian Jews lived their everyday lives—how they raised their children, spent their leisure time, practiced their religion, performed their charity work, and more.

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On this evening, George Prochnik presents his bildungsroman on Gershom Scholem, one of the twentieth century’s most important humanist thinkers. Prochnik traces the lifeline of Scholem, and weaves it with an intimate story of his own youth, marriage, and spiritual quest in Jerusalem.

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In the new history, We’ll Always Have Casablanca, film historian Noah Isenberg gives a rich account of this beloved movie’s origins. Through extensive research and interviews with filmmakers, film critics, family members of the cast and crew, and diehard fans, Isenberg reveals the myths and realities behind Casablanca’s production, focusing in particular on the central role of refugees—nearly all the actors were immigrants from Hitler’s Europe.

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Ismar Schorsch, former President of the Leo Baeck Institute, will engage in conversation with David Ellenson about the former’s newly published book, a biography of 19th century academic Leopold Zunz.

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One of the jewels of the collection of the National Library of Israel is Ms. Heb. 8o6527, a stunningly illuminated High-Holiday Mahzor from the second quarter of the fourteenth century. Librarians and curators have long sought ways to provide access to unique works like this, which remain untouchable when exhibited and offer none of the physical pleasures of books when digitized. World-class craftsmen like Michael and Linda Falter of Facsimile Editions offer yet another solution: the production of facsimiles of important manuscripts as a one-to-one reproduction, designed to imitate the original down to the last detail. The event will focus on the Falters’ stunning recreation of the Catalan Mahzor as well as the original book’s remarkable journey.

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After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. The Nazi Hunters focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten—and who were determined to track them down to the farthest corners of the earth. At this book talk, Andrew Nagorski will discuss his new book.

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The New York Times bestselling author Lauren Belfer (A Fierce Radiance and City of Light) speaks about her new and passionate novel—inspired by historical events—about two women, one European and one American, and the mysterious choral masterpiece by Johann Sebastian Bach that changes both their lives. In the ruins of Germany in 1945, at the…

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