LBI News

LBI News is the official newsletter of Leo Baeck Institute. It appears in print and online three times annually in Fall, Winter, and Spring. Click the image to download a PDF copy.

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Exile in the Spotlight—LBI to Sponsor Conference on Émigré Theater Giant Kurt Hirschfeld

When the National Socialist regime engineered the “alignment” of cultural institutions from Berlin to Vienna with its own rigid ideological principles, the Schauspielhaus in Zurich became a refuge for free German theater. Even during the war years, audiences in Zurich could see radical new works by banned German playwrights, contemporary international works in translation, and…

LBI Partners with Genealogists to Focus on “Family Matters”

In the first of a series of measures aimed at improving access to its collections for family historians, LBI recently partnered with a group of German-Jewish genealogists to digitize Jüdische Familienforschung (Jewish Family Research), a genealogical journal published in Germany between 1924 and 1938. Funding was provided by the “German-Jewish Special Interest Group” (GerSIG), which…

From Gleiwitz to Shanghai, Digitized Periodicals offer Snapshots of Jewish Life

The LBI Library is pleased to announce that about 60 new periodicals are already available online through DigiBaeck and Internet Archive, with about 40 further periodicals in process. Among the rare items now available are 20th -century newsletters from various Jewish communities in Germany, Austria, and other German-speaking areas. Other highlights include publications from German-Jewish…

Josef Joffe on the “Golden Age” of German-speaking Jewry

Josef Joffe is the editor of Germany’s largest weekly newspaper, Die Zeit, and one of the most influential voices on international affairs today. On December 3, 2014, he will deliver the 57th annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture and accept the Leo Baeck Medal. His Lecture will be titled, The Golden Age of German Jewry, 1871…

Gerald Westheimer Career Development Fellows

Thanks to the generosity of Professor Gerald Westheimer, LBI has supported fellowships for scholars who are early in their careers to pursue research on the social, cultural, and academic aspects of the life of Jews in German-speaking countries between the time of Moses Mendelssohn and the Third Reich and its aftermath. LBI is proud to…

WWI Correspondence—Karl Henschel, a Volunteer from Berlin

During the first year of the war, German soldiers sent six million letters every day, and received another 8.5 million. Soldiers’ letters were almost immediately instrumentalized to shape public perceptions about the war, and the publication of letters quickly became an important way of memorializing the fallen, who came in unprecedented numbers. Among the first…

WWI Memoirs—Helmut Freund, a physician from Berlin

About 300 memoirs in LBI collections describe the experiences of Jewish soldiers in the German and Austro-Hungarian armies, from ordinary infantrymen to celebrated pilots to physicians and Jewish field chaplains. Helmut Freund was born around 1896 in Berlin and served as an auxiliary physician in the German Army. Like many highly assimilated, middle-class German Jews…

WWI Photographs—Bernhard Bardach, an Austrian military surgeon

Bernhard Bardach was a 48-year-old career medical officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army when war broke out. He served on the Eastern and Western fronts, but he was able to spend much of his time during the war painting, writing extensive diaries, and taking over 900 remarkable photographs which have been digitized by LBI. Bernhard Bardach…

WWI Art—Hermann Struck’s portraits of Muslim POWs

As empires clung to their supremacy and nationalist movements advanced an opposing vision of the link between ethnicity and state, troop movements and migrations brought people from across the globe into contact with one another. Artists like Hermann Struck, a Zionist and orthodox Jew from Berlin, turned an ethnographic lens on various groups of “exotic”…