In our Midst. Facets of Jewish Life in Leipzig in the Modern Era

The Leipzig Brühl around 1920. Leipzig Jewish Community Collection, F 9629.
One of Leipzig’s oldest streets, the Brühl was flanked by narrow alleys and
courtyards with houses that traditionally offered lodging for Jewish fur traders
during the Leipzig Messe. In the early 20th century, these were replaced by the
furriers’ grand warehouse and office buildings, which reflected the city’s
significance as a hub for the fur trade. When this photograph was taken, around
10,000 people worked in Leipzig’s fur industry, supplying about a third of all fur
goods worldwide.

This exhibition at the City Library of Leipzig illuminates this history with items from LBI’s own rich collection alongside loans from local institutions including the Ephraim Carlebach Foundation and the City History Museum in Leipzig.

Wissenschaft des Judentums: Jewish Studies and the Shaping of Jewish Identity

Moritz Steinschneider writing at his desk

This exhibit shows that the early academic study of Judaism was directly motivated by the desire for the civil rights still denied Jews in Europe in the 19th century. Moreover, the “Wissenschaft des Judentums” would become the forum in which most of the competing visions for how Jews should exist within the larger society and how they should practice Judaism were articulated and advanced.

New Exhibition on Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany held in Ambassador’s Residence

(© / Zacarias Garcia)

On Monday, March 17, Ambassador Peter Ammon hosted the opening of a new Leo Baeck Institute exhibition at his residence. “Advancing Modernity: Jewish Berliners in Weimar Germany, 1919-1933” was curated by the Leo Baeck Institute from its extensive collection of personal papers, books and other artifacts. The exhibit features the outstanding achievements of several Jewish…